3 in 4 Europeans blame EU for high unemployment

Despite the EU unemployment rate being 8.6%, its lowest rate since 2009, the majority of Europeans want the EU to do more to address the issue, according to a Eurobarometer survey. 

 

77% of the 28,000 European’s surveyed said that they want more EU action to reduce the unemployment rate, with 69% also saying that they felt the current level of effort is “insufficient”.

Today, unemployment in the EU varies dramatically, with the Czech republic who only has 4% unemployment compared to Greece’s 24%.

Nevertheless, throughout the EU youth unemployment is still high at 18.6%.

The survey, which was commissioned by the European Parliament, shows that reducing unemployment is actually the second most important issue for Europeans, with combating terrorism being listed as the biggest concern.

Thomas Händel, the Head of Parliament’s employment committee, urged EU leaders to “endeavour to ensure investment and high-quality, sustainable employment”.

Mr Händel went on to say that “the results show that the EU’s founding goal of an end to war no longer suffices,” explaining that the “new thrust of Europe must be one of social justice, an end to joblessness and poverty.” One person in four lives at or below the OECD poverty line, youth unemployment remains unacceptably high, while the increase in insecure jobs is leading more and more people to doubt the founding pledge of more prosperity through economic cooperation.”

He further added that “one person in four lives at or below the OECD poverty line, youth unemployment remains unacceptably high, while the increase in insecure jobs is leading more and more people to doubt the founding pledge of more prosperity through economic cooperation.”

The EU’s Europe 2020 Strategy, one of the top priorities for the Juncker Commission, includes goals on youth mobility, innovation, education and social inclusion, and aims to lift at least 20 million Europeans out of poverty by the end of the decade.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s